This is where WE need to be: Using Muslim youth oral histories to teach about diversity and tolerance

This is where WE need to be: Using Muslim youth oral histories to teach about diversity and tolerance

Friday, March 25 from 9 am to 4 pm

Teachers College, Columbia University

In 2007, a group of Muslim youth in New York City came together to learn how to produce written oral histories of fellow Muslim youth. Titled This Is Where I Need To Be, these texts were first published in 2008 by the Muslim Youth Project and the Student Press Initiative of Teachers College, Columbia University, with an accompanying curriculum guide available in 2009. We are now proud to announce the printing of a second edition of both This Is Where I Need To Be and its curriculum guide and invite you to come celebrate withus and receive a free copy of both books along with professional development around how to incorporate these texts into your curriculum.

Whatever you think you know about Muslims in America, these stories rise above the news-cycle stereotypes to open a personal window onto what it means to be young and Muslim in America today.

But why bring This is Where I Need to Be into your classrooms?

* It reflects the diversity and varied experiences of Muslim youth in the United States.

* It sheds light on a growing demographic increasingly misrepresented in post-9/11 America.

* It promotes tolerance in multicultural classrooms.

* It offers rich instructional opportunities for the busy instructor.

* It invites students to engage critically with oral history.

Come receive your free copy of both This is Where I Need to Be and its curriculum guide in a one day professional development conference at Teachers College, Columbia University on March 25, 2011 from 9 am to 4 pm. Listen to presentations by and participate in conversations with veteran classroom teachers as well as Teachers College faculty and staff members. At the end of the day, we believe in the safety and celebration of all of our students and their respective cultures, and we believe the lessons learned from experiences and perspectives of Muslim youth can easily be projected as lessons from which we all can benefit.

Please contact us to ask questions, RSVP and register by March 18, 2011 by e-mailing publishspi@gmail.com or calling 212-678-3161.